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Satellite Sessions Schedule

 

Satellite sessions will be offered on Monday 27 October and Friday 31 October. Click here to download a printable schedule of the satellite sessions and a conference area map. 

Monday, 27 October

Meeting Room 1.41 - 1.42 Meeting Room 1.43 - 1.44 Meeting Room 1.61 - 1.62 Meeting Room 1.63 - 1.64 Offsite
The Southern Sun, Cape Sun

Preventing Cell-associated HIV Transmission with Antibodies: Implications for PrEP and Vaccine Development
08:30 - 12:30

Early Infection Cohorts: Insights for Design of Vaccines and Other Interventions
08:30 - 12:30

Advocates Pre-conference Workshop: Strengthening Advocacy for Research to Rollout for All
08:30 - 16:30

Where the Rubber Meets The Road: HIV Prevention Research in the PEPFAR Care and Treatment Setting
08:30 - 10:30

Addressing Regulatory Challenges Associated with HIV Vaccine Trials in the Evolving World of Standards for Treatment and Prevention
08:00 - 13:00

Break | 10:30 - 12:00

Mind the Gaps – Economic, Programmatic and Human Dimensions of Access to Future AIDS Vaccines and Their Importance for Decision-making in R&D
12:00 - 14:00

Lunch | 12:30 - 13:30 Lunch | 12:30 - 13:30

Defining the Correlates of Protection In HIV-Exposed Seronegative (HESN) Individuals
13:30 - 17:30

The Road to Adherence: Lessons Learned, Barriers and Drivers, and Innovative Solutions
13:30 - 17:00

   
Break | 14:00 - 14:30

Help End AIDS together: Working Toward Vaccine and Cure for HIV/AIDS
14:30 - 16:30


Friday, 31 October

Meeting Room 1.61 - 1.62  Meeting Room 1.63 - 1.64 Roof Terrace Room
 

Multi-Purpose Prevention Technologies (MPTs): The Future of HIV and STI Protection?
13:30 - 16:30

 

What Can We Learn from Innovative Interventions to Increase the Uptake of Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in Eastern and Southern African Countries?
13:30 - 15:30

 

The Road from Cape Town: Laying the Groundwork for a New Era of HIV Prevention R&D
13:30 - 17:30


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Monday 27 October


Satellite Session
08:30 - 12:30
Room 1.41 - 1.42

Preventing Cell-associated HIV Transmission with Antibodies: Implications for PrEP and Vaccine Development

Host Institutions: Boston University and CEA/IDMIT
Session Chairs: Deborah Anderson and Roger LeGrand

Whereas HIV may be transmitted via infected cells in genital secretions and breast milk, cell-associated HIV transmission has been largely neglected by the HIV prevention research community, which has primarily focused on cell-free virus infection models. We will invite eight 20-minute presentations plus a 10-minute discussion on various aspects of cell-mediated HIV transmission with a focus on the use of antibodies, delivered through topical microbicides or vaccines, to prevent this mechanism of HIV transmission.

 

Satellite Session
08:30 - 12:30
Room 1.43 - 1.44

Early Infection Cohorts: Insights for Design of Vaccines and Other Interventions

Host Institution: International AIDS Vaccine Initiative
Session Chair: Jill Gilmour

Studies of early HIV infection with longitudinal follow-up have contributed in many ways to our understanding of the epidemic: clinical course of infection, risk factors, potential public health/behavioral or structural interventions, nature of transmitted viruses, interplay of host immune response and genetics with viral variation/escape, evolution of broadly neutralizing antibodies and others. This session will review the cohorts on which the work has been based and the key findings, with an emphasis on insights for vaccine design and value for other prevention methods. The participants will be asked to provide brief descriptions of cohorts and available specimens and to describe the key research questions addressed and major findings. Cohort studies and immune correlates of protection in the context of superinfection may also be included. Discussion will focus on remaining questions, potential collaborations and what additional clinical studies are required to resolve remaining scientific questions and improve public health.

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Satellite Session
08:30 - 16:30
Room 1.61 - 1.62

Advocates' Pre-conference Workshop: Strengthening Advocacy for Research to Rollout

Host Institutions: AMAG, AVAC, GYCA, IRMA, International HIV/AIDS Alliance, NHVMAS, Sonke Gender Justice, Siyaifuna, Southern African AIDS Trust, World AIDS Campaign
Session Chairs
Manju Chatani, Sydney Hushie, Rosemary Mburu and Ntando Yola

The current HIV prevention landscape offers new opportunities and challenges to advocates interested in biomedical HIV prevention R&D as well as implementation of positive results into policies and programs. International, African and South African civil society partners will hold this workshop to equip advocates, new investigators, community liaison officers and other stakeholders to more fully participate in biomedical HIV prevention research and HIVR4P. The workshop will provide an overview of the field to contextualize themes/issues at HIVR4P; connect research and advocacy priorities and explore common goals; and build capacity of advocates and trial staff to better engage with emerging issues. More information at www.avac.org/hivr4p

As capacity is limited, please register here to reserve a place https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/QHRJ6F8

Have you ever used PrEP, now or in the past? If so, we would love to hear from you!

As part of the Advocates’ Pre-Conference Workshop, we are organizing a panel of PrEP users to speak about our lived experience. We are looking for PrEP users from a variety of backgrounds and experiences, including diversity in terms of gender, age, ethnicity, sexual orientation, different regions of the world, in serodiscordant relationships, single and sexually active, using drugs, sex worker, trying to conceive (PrEP-ception), current and former PrEP study participants… If you will be in Cape Town at the end of October, please let me know!  Please contact me directly at maleblanc27@yahoo.ca if you are interested. And please share this information with any individuals who might be interested, as well as through any networks or listservs that might reach PrEP users attending the HIV R4P Conference.

 

Satellite Session
08:30 - 10:30
Room 1.63 - 1.64

Where the Rubber Meets the Road: HIV Prevention Research in the PEPFAR Care and Treatment Setting

Host Institution: US Military HIV Research Program
Session Chair: Nelson Michael

Conducting HIV research in the care and treatment setting directly integrates scientific inquiry with service delivery. Such investigation informs global health programs including those supported by the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief. Within its international network, the U.S. Military HIV Research Program (MHRP) recognizes the opportunities afforded by leveraging traditional clinical research and implementation science. Engaging collaborators and colleagues in the field, this session will highlight ongoing PEPFAR prevention research efforts in key populations and define challenges to addressing critical evidence gaps. Highlighted research will include cost-effectiveness analysis in PMTCT delivery models in Kenya, uptake of treatment as prevention by MSM in trusted community centers in Nigeria, and a long-term cohort study evaluating prevention outcomes in Kenya, Tanzania, Nigeria, and Uganda.

Satellite Session
08:00 - 13:00
Offsite: The Southern Sun Cape Sun | Strand Street, Cape Town

Addressing Regulatory Challenges Associated with HIV Vaccine Trials in the Evolving World of Standards for Treatment and Prevention

Host Institutions: Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative (Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada and the Alliance Coordinating Office) in collaboration with WHO, the Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Session Chairs: Representatives from National Regulatory Agencies
 
With new vaccine trials in development, this satellite will bring together regulators and researchers to discuss mechanisms to address the regulatory issues and challenges associated with the new and potentially more complex HIV vaccine clinical trials, such as the HIV Vaccine Trials Network sponsored P5 trials and others, that will be taking place in Africa and Southeast Asia. The session will address the growing consensus that effective vaccine development will require a combination of approaches within the landscape of increasingly effective non-vaccine HIV prevention strategies and adaptive clinical trial designs that will require increased interaction between researchers and regulators.
 
Satellite Session
12:00 - 14:00
Room 1.63 - 1.64

Mind the Gaps – Economic, Programmatic and Human Dimensions of Access to Future AIDS Vaccines and Their Importance for Decision-Making in R&D

Host Institutions: International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, U.S. Military HIV Research Program, HIV Vaccine Trials Network, UNAIDS, The Foundation for AIDS Research
Session Chairs: Alex Coutinho and Glenda Gray

It will be particularly important for future HIV/AIDS vaccines to demonstrate their potential impact and cost-effectiveness, and their suitability for public health programs, early in the research and development (R&D) process, to ensure they will be accessible to those in need. The formulations of and the vaccination approaches for HIV/AIDS vaccines are likely to be more complex than with other vaccines to date (vectors, adjuvants; different vaccines for prime and boost). Other HIV prevention options are progressing towards licensure, and the competition with other diseases for funding is increasing as is the need to assure optimal use of the funding available. The health care systems in most affected countries may lack sufficient infrastructure and personnel to optimize access. And the target populations for HIV/AIDS vaccination can be particularly difficult to reach and motivate given barriers like cultural and social norms, gender inequity, stigma, discrimination and punitive laws, as well as individual beliefs, perceptions and behaviors. HIV/AIDS vaccine R&D should happen in close and constant interaction with the people who most need a vaccine, as well as the governments and others who will fund, decide, and/or plan future vaccination programs. By exploring the interdependencies between product R&D and access, the session will help advance these interactions.
 
Satellite Session
13:30 - 17:30
Room 1.41 - 1.42

Defining the Correlates of Protection In HIV-Exposed Seronegative (HESN) Individuals

Host Institutions: University of Manitoba and Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative Research and Development Alliance Coordinating Office
Session Chair: Blake Ball
 
The development of biomedical HIV prevention efforts have been hampered by the lack of understanding of clear correlates of protection against HIV infection. Several candidates of protection against HIV infection have emerged from studying HIV-exposed seronegative (HESN) individuals. Despite repeated exposure to HIV, these individuals appear to show natural resistance to HIV infection that in many cases can be attributed to host genetic and/or immune factors. A HESN satellite session at HIV R4P will allow those in the HESN field to reconvene to share knowledge, data and findings of correlates of protection and link with researchers in the HIV prevention field to translate these findings into practice.

Satellite Session
13:30 - 17:00
Room 1.43 - 1.44

The Road to Adherence: Lessons Learned, Barriers and Drivers, and Innovative Solutions

Host Institution: CONRAD
Session Chair: Gustavo Doncel
Click here to download the session agenda.  
The issue of adherence is a primary concern during the clinical trial process. The goal of this satellite session is to review what we've learned thus far in clinical trials, discuss new data regarding barriers and drivers, user-centered research and design, objective markers of adherence, and alternative trials designs, and finally, how to apply this knowledge to future microbicide trials. Ideo, a human-centered product design research study initiated by CONRAD, is investigating strategies to improve messaging, product design and packaging aimed at increasing product uptake and consistent use in target populations (especially young women) and will present initial findings.

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Satellite Session
14:30 - 16:30
Room 1.63 - 1.64

Help End AIDS Together: Working Toward Vaccine and Cure for HIV/AIDS

Host Institutions: International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, International AIDS Society Toward a Vaccine Cure Initiative 
Session Chairs: Linda-Gail Bekker and Margie McGlynn
 
Ending AIDS will require a halt to new HIV infections and liberation from lifelong treatment for those already infected. Adding both a preventive vaccine and a cure to existing treatment and prevention will be essential to this effort. The session will explore how enhanced collaboration and potential synergies among research into preventive vaccines and cure could accelerate the end of AIDS.

AIDS vaccine and cure researchers have long been riddled by HIV's unparalleled challenges: its rapid mutation and enormous global variability, lifelong persistent infection, direct targeting of immune cells and lack of correlates and predictive animal models to predict efficacy in humans. Increased understanding of the immune responses that prevent or control infection and of how anti-retroviral treatment controls HIV, the advent of new technologies and recent breakthroughs have renewed optimism and confidence for both vaccines and cure. Scientists are finding close associations between approaches to prevent infection and those to control viral replication and transmission. Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) capable of preventing infection had a strong therapeutic effect when passively administered to SHIV-infected monkeys, reducing viral load to undetectable levels. And a vaccine candidate aimed at inducing T-cell responses in monkeys controlled SIV infection to undetectable levels, suggesting that cellular immune responses could also be beneficial prophylactically and therapeutically. New insights into the induction and role of bnAbs, T-cell responses and immune-based therapies are proving crucial in both vaccine and cure research.


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Friday 31 October


Satellite Session
13:30 - 16:30
Room 1.61 - 1.62

Multi-Purpose Prevention Technologies (MPTs): The Future of HIV and STI Protection?

Host Institution: Population Council, WHO
Session Chairs: José Fernández-Romero and Manjula Lusti-Narasimhan
 
Every day, more than 1 million people are newly infected with STIs that can lead to morbidity, mortality and an increased risk of HIV acquisition. Strategies including behavior change, condom promotion, and therapy have not reduced STIs worldwide, pointing to the need for novel approaches that prevent both HIV and STIs.

This session explores the impact of key STIs; their role in increasing susceptibility to HIV; new biomedical prevention approaches including topical microbicides and multi-purpose prevention technologies (MPTs); and the scientific and regulatory hurdles that must be overcome to make combination HIV/STI prevention a reality.

 

Satellite Session
13:30 - 17:30
Roof Terrace Room

The Road from Cape Town: Laying the Groundwork for a New Era of HIV Prevention R&D

Host Institutions: South African Medical Research Council, HIV Vaccine Trials Network, HIV AIDS Vaccines Ethics Group, University of KwaZulu-Natal, AVAC, University of Toronto, Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative, IAVI
Session Chairs: Glenda Gray, Stacey Hannah, Catherine Slack, and Ntando Yola
 
This interactive session will facilitate understanding and practical implementation of GPP in large-scale HIV prevention research, including community preparedness and informed consent. Trial designers, network and site staff, policy makers, review bodies and advocates will discuss strategic engagement and steps required to prepare communities and sites for large-scale efficacy trials. The session will facilitate understanding of community engagement, practical implementation of GPP and experiences and tools developed for informed consent/assessing understanding of informed consent (IC/AOU). This session will bring together diverse stakeholders to reflect on current approaches and identify opportunities to strengthen engagement throughout the trial design and implementation processes.

Satellite Session
13:30 - 15:30
Room 1.63 - 1.64

What Can We Learn from Innovative Interventions to Increase the Uptake of Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in Eastern and Southern African Countries?

Host Institution: International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie)
Session Chair: Annette N. Brown
 
In this session, four teams from studies undertaken in four different countries will present new evidence on innovative interventions to increase the uptake of VMMC throughout Eastern and Southern Africa.

The evidence will include findings from four different impact evaluation studies aiming to increase the uptake of VMMC using various types of interventions. The interventions include a sport-based intervention, two behavior change communication interventions (with one using mobile technology), and an intervention that uses behavioral economics by compensating men for opportunity costs resulting from undergoing VMMC. The presentations and discussions between researchers and program implementers in this session will highlight synergies and differences between findings.